The soul remembers all of this. How I swept the floor/ with my golden hair. How I fed it watermelon and wine / from a porcelain dish. How I called it teacher and it called me teacher’s pet

Metaphysical in concern and hypermodern in tone, Bridget Lowe returns in this appropriately titled, much-anticipated second collection, determined as ever to make meaning from the perversity of suffering. My Second Work is rare in its ability to be both completely idiosyncratic and widely resonant, as Lowe transforms experiences of shame, disgust, and bewilderment into a kind of mutant hope. Poems in this collection have appeared in The New Yorker and Poetry and were honored by the Poetry Society of America.

 

Advance Praise for My Second Work

“No poet writing today is more direct than Bridget Lowe: at the same time, no poet is more uncanny, more seductively strange. These poems love the world that does not always love them back. They’re brilliant, scary, and heartbreakingly alive.” 

 – James Longenbach   

“There's a modern irony and rue to Lowe's poetry, a tinge of the surreal, even a suggestion of the horroristic, that makes it wholly contemporary." 

– Dana Levin

 

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Praise for At the Autopsy of Vaslav Nijinsky

There is bravery in Lowe’s focus on emotions besides love and hate, in the rigor and ruthlessness with which she describes, instead, disappointment, disgust, humiliation, and mild surprise…The poems in this book go deep, beyond the beauty and the ugliness, as T.S. Eliot instructs, to "the boredom, and the horror, and the glory."

The Kenyon Review   

The God-drunk, savage, beautiful, monstrous, visionary poems of Bridget Lowe's first collection pull in the low frequencies that are rooted in the body and the high frequencies that are emitted like light from, let's call it, the spirit...The poems are audacious in their performance of the body and soul under duress: pilgrims, prophets, disgraced actors, scientists, dancers: wild boys all. She sings in "Orphic dissonance." It's a brilliant, wonderful book.
Bruce Smith
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